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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> welcome to the program. tonight we begin with new orleans the city, and three people who recently moved back here because of their love of it. reflecting are james carville, mary matalin and julia reed. >> so what do you love about being here? >> let us count the ways. >> this is the way that i can explain new orleans. everybody else talks about a quality of life. you live in washington,-- the mondayments, the buildings, the kennedy center, the universities, the great medical centres, very highly rated quality of life. here no one ever speaks of the quality of life, it's a way of life. we have our music, our food, our social structure, our architecture, our body of literature. we even have our own funerals. so weeasure qlity of life by way of life, if our way of iv is intact and our culture is intact, then that's fine. and we don't really, in a big part of our way of life is to be comfortable with our otherness. we really don't aspire. we love to go to new york. we love to go to las vegas, and we love to go to washington, or anywhere. >> rose: even paris. >> paris who wou
-winning humorist dave barry about miami, the "insane city" that's the focus of his new novel. >> the people come from everywhere, people just weird people are attracted to miami. the wildlife is weird, the weather is weird, it's a festering stew of weirdness. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was de ssible b the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: millions of people in the northeast and new england battened down for a weekend blizzard today. forecasters warned it could be one for the record books. by this afternoon, the gathering storm was beginning to whiten the landscape for hundreds of miles, with long
something. >> ifill: the president took that message to minneapolis, a city that's already imposed stricter background checks on gun buyers. the white house plan calls for those checks, a renewed ban on assault-style weapons and limits on high-capacity magazines for ammunition. >> the only way we can reduce gun violence in this country is if the american people decide it's important. if you decide it's important. if parents and teachers, police officers and pastors, hunters and sportsmen, americans of every background stand up and say, "this time it's got to be different." >> ifill: the obama administration has been working to build on public outrage sparked by the mass shooting in newtown connecticut that left 20 children and six adults dead. ♪ for purple mountain majesty ♪ above... >> ifill: echos of that crime were still in the air last night at the super bowl where the sandy hook elementary school chorus sang "america the beautiful" before kick-off. and a super bowl ad paid for by mayors against illegal guns, a gun-control group, financed by new york mayor michael bloomberg, appeale
, "after newtown" wraps up tonight with a report from chicago on the public health crisis in the city in the wake of rising gun violence. >> the people who come in after having been shot are some of the highest risk folks. these are people who have been shot, who may have been shot before, and really without some intervention, without some life- changing moment, the trajectory's either going to be jail or death. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> suarez: and, as a magistrate grants oscar pistorius bail, we talk to charlayne hunter gault about how his arrest has focused attention on the unusually high rate of violence against women in south africa. >> domestic violence is shot through the entire society from the highest of the highed in socioeconomic terms to the lowest of the low. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> steven brill is here, he wrote the cover story of this week's "time" magazine. it is called bitter pill, why medical bills are killing us. it is the longest piece by a single author ever published by time. it took brill seven months to research and write. he analyzes bills from hospitals, doctors an drug companies to paint an extraordinary picture of medical overspendingment i'm pleased to have stef steven brill back at this table, welcome. >> thanks, charlie. >> rose: what got you here this longest piece. >> as you know i like t pick topics where i just feel that i'm curious about them. and for a long time i have just been curious about why health-care costs so much. you know, we've had years of debate about who should pay for health care. how should we do insurance, and who should pay the bills. but i've never seen anyone stop to say hey, wait a minute, how come if will cost you 20 or 25,000 dollars if god-- as you're walking ot of this building, you slip-and-fall and land on your elbow. whwill it cost a million
funding provided by these funders:. >> from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: jay fishman is here, he is is the chairman & ceo of travelers. it is one of the nation's leading providers in property & casualty insurance. travelers has also been a leader in corporate america to help educate the public at america's debt crisis. the company recently partnered with public television on a documentary underscoring the urgent challenge ahead it is called overdraft and here is the trailer. >> some people understandably say this is sort of dry subject, dollars, cents, debt. what's it mean to me. if i read the mathematics right it means everything. >> i really genuinely believe this threatens the fundamental economic security of the united states. >> a lot of the democrats are mad because they say well, this is mostly caused by the republicans. without cut taxes and increased spending. the problem for the democrats is that if you look at the next ten years, most of it will be caused by things we care about. >> all of us are invested in this democracy. we are to the going
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)